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Forum > Starting out! - Need advice? > need advice please

Missing Elfrida A.
04 September 2019, 07:18
I found all the above advice very helpful.

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Missing Roland B.
09 July 2015, 16:30
Just joined the site and looking for some advice please. I'm a 60 year old guy who has not exercised in years,, but looking to get some fitness and weight loss back into my life,, also I'm Asthmatic. So the question is,, are there any hints or tips on how far / fast / often I should be going to start with.

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Thumb Victoria L.
15 April 2015, 20:52
I got my bike from Halfords. Its a Carrera. It cost me £300 and I love it. Other than the odd tweaking of the gears from time to time as I do some miles, its been a great first road bike. Hope this helps? 😊

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Thumb Neil M.
09 April 2015, 14:38
Just getting back into the saddle after a few years out. But need a need a new bike. My last ridding was done off road. But now wanting to ride road but not a speed freak, rather enjoy the back roads and take in the scenery and the ride. I cant make my ride up on a bike with a budget of 600 my local dealer does very little in this price range with his average price of £1500. I have thought about cycle cross bike for country lanes etc. But unsure. Found my old MTB heavy and slow and I usually knackered on it after 10 miles.

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Thumb Rob F.
11 November 2014, 20:56
How did you get on in the end Danielle?

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Missing Danielle M.
22 February 2014, 15:20
So ive signed up to do a charity event London to Paris 313 Miles over 4 days. Im not an experienced rider, i haven't even got a bike other than my Halfords Special that has sat in the shed for the past how many years. So basically can anyone offer me advice??? There's me thinking im doing a good deed for disabled children raising a minimum of £1500 (if not i have to put the short fall) now i have realized im going to have to spend roughly £500-£1000 on the gear also to do it. Was hoping a bike shop would be willing to sponsor me or even provide a bike, How wrong was i. Has anyone else ever done anything like this??

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Thumb Marc N.
02 May 2012, 19:27
and is sooo looking forward to doing the 56 mile London to southend bike ride... and to be honest i've find meself looking for longer charity bike ride

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Thumb Marc N.
02 May 2012, 19:25
Evening chaps, the latest update. Wow what a difference, took some time to get used to as never rode a road bike before, performance wise its a lot faster and easier and it nice to keep up with my friends now only prob i got is the saddle talk about sore bum lol.. all i want now a is catseye bike computer wireless i might add and im well away :P. .... P.s thats the new bike i got as a profile pic

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Thumb Steven G.
13 April 2012, 07:40
you got a good lady Paul

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Thumb Paul G.
13 April 2012, 06:15
Way to go Marc's wife :D Enjoy!!

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Thumb Marc N.
12 April 2012, 20:48
Thank you every1 for your comments. The latest update is now im doing Spinning classes and now the wife suprised me last night with a new road bike. so now im happy as a pig in mud lol :p, so now im in full training mode .... london to southend here i come lol

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Thumb Helen O.
23 March 2012, 18:35
Spinning classes will really help with your fitness levels and long training rides will help with the stamina. I did a 280 mile charity ride last year over five days through some very hilly terrain in Kenya, all on a mountain bike (with bar ends) and I don't think I could have done it if I hadn't upped my fitness with the spinning. Have fun on the ride :-)

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Thumb Marc N.
17 March 2012, 21:38
thank you all for your advise, i will be changing the tires and now im training off and on the bike like mad to increase my fitness levels. i will keep u guys posted on how i get on with the bike ride again A big thank you to every 1

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Thumb Matthew F.
16 March 2012, 13:04
All good advice. Skinny tyres is the way. Don't bother with drop bars, as said they need new brakes and gears, and intermediate bikes have longer frames than road bikes so you'd be too stretched out. Besides, your mates on their roadies will be 'on the tops' most of the time anyway, so no difference really. Lastly, stay in the bunch, don't go up front. Let them cut the air for you. They'll understand. Lastly, enjoy and take the time to remember it. matt

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Thumb Kit M.
16 March 2012, 11:25
Like everyone else says Marc, changing to thinner slick tyres would be the cheapest and most obvious way to make cycling on the road a bit quicker. Just make sure you're not going thinner than your wheel rims are designed to take. If it doesn't state directly on the rims, you should be able to find out from the make and model online or directly from contacting the bike/wheel manufacturer. More than anything, just enjoy it whatever speed you go at.

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Thumb Paul G.
16 March 2012, 07:30
Hi Marc .Okay my 2 cents. Changing your handlebars will not make a huge difference to your speed, but bar ends will help on the hills when you are up on the cranks & they will give you alternate hand positions over long distances. Changing to a narrower "road tyre" with reduced tread will help your speed indeed. The term is "rolling resistance" & the less the tyre has (in this case) the better. You'll notice Road Bikes (what used to referred to as "racers" ) have this feature. Road Bike handlebars will allow you to shift your hands to the drops, the hoods or the flat bar in front of you & a 700 x 23 "slick" will have minimal rolling resistance. Yes the gearing is easier on the legs on a Hybrid & a MTB but a "roadie" at the same fitness level will beat you up a hill 99% of the time & as for on the flat, keeping up...good luck As for comfort, road bikes aren't that comfortable at first, but out of my MTB, my Ridgeback Supernova Hybrid & my roadbike, I'd ride the Road Bike anyday. You do get used to a roadbike saddle or rather your "sit bones" do & you don't notice it after a while. Opting for a super squishy gel saddle isn't a great option for a gent either. The saddle compresses when you sit on it & can put pressure on areas of anatomy that can create problems for a man in the long run. A hybrid is what it is & you can only make it so much like a Road Bike, I know, I tried & spent a lot of ££ trying. In the end they are worlds apart performance wise. Keep on riding & increasing your fitness will make you faster too Like I said, just my 2 cents

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Thumb Marc N.
13 March 2012, 21:38
A big thank you to every1 for all your advice. I done the charity bike ride last year on a heavy mountain bike (52 miles) doing it again this year with my friends on a hybrid and what with the tire change and the bar ends hopefull i can beat my time :P :) again thank you every 1

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Thumb Tammy O.
13 March 2012, 21:14
Hi Marc, I have to agree with everything that has been advised so far, I did a similar ride on a heavy hybrid and at the end of the day the skinnier tyres made all the difference, bar ends too, as I was able to alter my hand position whenever needed. At the time I had done all my training on that bike and I don't think I could have done much better on a different bike. At the end of the day to be elite you must train like an elite LOL. Enjoy your ride and be proud of raising loads of money for a worthy cause, no matter what your time.

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Thumb Terry J.
13 March 2012, 21:07
Another advantage of hybrids in general is that the uphills are generally a lot easier thanks to the gearing. With that and bar ends to help pull you up you will find yourself passing a lot of roadies on the hills. I found that when we did the 75 mile Nottingham bike ride last year it was maintaining a good average speed that was key to our success and part of that was staying on the bike, a lot easier on a hybrid.

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Thumb Jennifer T.
13 March 2012, 20:51
bar ends are still a good idea though, because it gives you more variety in position options, which can be important for a long ride. :)

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Thumb Marc N.
13 March 2012, 20:27
thank you every1 for the advice i have got 700x28s on there at mo i will change them over again thank you

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Thumb Marc N.
13 March 2012, 20:21
Thank you for the advice chaps, i never thought of that (being uncomfortable) apart from getting a racer ( money being tight ) was just wondering if i could change the bike i got to make it any faster, teejay i will try changing the tires and see how i get on thank you marc

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Thumb Marc N.
13 March 2012, 20:21
Thank you for the advice chaps, i never thought of that (being uncomfortable) apart from getting a racer ( money being tight ) was just wondering if i could change the bike i got to make it any faster, teejay i will try changing the tires and see how i get on thank you marc

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Thumb Jim H.
13 March 2012, 20:17
Hi Marc, the simple answer is that simply changing the bars would make no difference to your speed. Also, it's not as simple as just buying new handlebars and swapping everything over, you'd need new brake levers and new gear shifters too. Your mates' racers are probably a bit lighter than your hybrid, with lighter wheels and thinner tyres, which makes some difference to speed, but handlebars, no. happy cycling Jim

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Thumb Deco C.
13 March 2012, 20:14
It will help you a bit because it'll give a more aerodynamic position, however I don't think it's worth for the money you'll have to invest. If I was you I'd just get narrow tyres, the narrowest you can fit on your wheels. I changed the 700x28 on my bike to a 23 and the difference is amazing!

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Thumb Terry J.
13 March 2012, 20:10
Hi Marc, personally I think you would gain a greater increase in speed by changing your tires to skinny race tires as this would reduce your road friction. Road bikes tend to be quicker because of their gearing and the lightness of their frames. Also bear in mind drop bars will alter your riding position which could be uncomfortable if you're not used to it. TeeJay

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Thumb Marc N.
13 March 2012, 20:07
thank you but would swaping the handle bars make any diffrence in speed ?

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Thumb John W.
13 March 2012, 20:05
bar ends would be a cheaper option

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Thumb Marc N.
13 March 2012, 19:40
Evening all, Im in need of some advise please i have got a claud butler lakeside hybrid is a gd bike but it got mountain bike style handle bars. The thing i need to know is would changing the handle bars like the ones on a racer make any real diffrence as in speed. Im doing the london to southend charity bike ride as want to be able to keep up with my friends as thay have racers regards marc

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